The aim of Youth and Policy is to publish articles which are based upon original, systematic research, or new and innovative contributions to existing thought regarding policies, concepts, and practices relating to young people.

The journal’s purposes are to:

  • highlight and critically debate contemporary issues relevant to young people in society, with
  • particular reference to youth and community work and related professional interventions;
  • provoke dialogue between policy-makers, academics and practitioners; and
  • encourage high-quality contributions to the debate around young people’s issues.

The journal is aimed at a readership of policy-makers, academics and practitioners.

Submissions

The editorial group welcomes the submission of unsolicited manuscripts relevant to the aims and purposes of the journal.

Articles must be the original work of the author(s) and must not be under consideration for publication elsewhere.

Manuscripts should be submitted as an e-mail attachment. They should be sent in the first instance to articles@youthandpolicy.org.

All articles are considered in the first instance by the editorial group. Those which are of an appropriate standard and meet the aims and purposes of the journal will be submitted anonymously to two external referees whose comments will be taken into consideration in editorial group discussions.

Editorial Decisions

Final decisions about publication will be made by the editorial group of Youth and Policy.

Decisions will be within the following range:

  • to publish without modification;
  • to publish after minor amendments by the author;
  • to ask the author to undertake some rewriting and to resubmit for reconsideration; or
  • not to publish.

The editors reserve the right to make minor modifications to manuscripts before they go to press, with reference to house style, legibility and grammatical conventions. However, any in-depth editing will be discussed with the author(s) prior to publication.

Length and Content

Articles should normally be between 3,000 and 8,000 words in length, plus references. Additional word length must be negotiated with the Editors.

Authors are expected to take an analytical approach to theoretical, practical and/or policy issues, or to critically present new empirical evidence concerning young people in society. Whilst the focus of the journal is upon contemporary issues, articles informed by historical evidence or with a historical focus will be considered.

Presentation

All articles should be written in English. The language should be accessible, free from jargon and sensitive to issues of equality and difference.

Articles should be typed with double spacing, preferably using Arial, minimum font size 12.

Use English spelling conventions (e.g. programme, organise, neighbourhood).

Pages should be numbered.

Authors must ensure they remove self-references and any reference to themselves as author at initial submission stage in order to ensure anonymous refereeing. All personal information should be provided on the cover sheet.

Cover Sheet

Each article should be accompanied by a cover sheet containing the following information:

  • Title of article.
  • Name, address and contact information for the corresponding author.
  • Names of all authors.
  • Word length of article (excluding abstract, references and notes).
  • Date of submission.
  • Affiliation or short description of each author – no more than 20 words is required.

Abstract and Keywords

Include an Abstract, indented and in italics, of no more than 150 words and up to five keywords.

Headings and Subheadings

Headings and subheadings should be clearly marked in relation to their status within the text.

The main title should be Upper Case, Bold.

Primary subheadings should be Lower Case, Bold.

Secondary subheadings Lower Case, Italic, Bold.

Quotations

When quoting directly, single quotation marks should always be used, unless quoting within a quote when double quotation marks are used.

Quotes of over 40 words should be indented. Indented quotes do not require quotation marks but should be in italics. When a quote is presented within an indented quote, use single quotation marks.

References

Each publication cited in the text should be listed alphabetically and in full at the end of the article.

Authors are advised to check their references for omissions and dates very carefully prior to submission of manuscripts. Failure to do so can lead to significant delays in an article proceeding publication.

The Harvard System should be used for references.

In the main text, use author’s surname and year of publication in parentheses, with page numbers where appropriate. For example:

After a quotation or to refer to related material: (Smith, 1994:25)

Within discussion:

As Smith (1994) suggests …

Some researchers (e.g. Smith,1994) have suggested that …

Each publication cited should be listed alphabetically, by author surname, and in full at the end of the article as in the examples below:

For a Book:

Banks, S. (2010) Ethical Issues in Youth Work, London and New York: Routledge.

For a Book Chapter:

Robertson, S. (2009) ‘Withywood Youth Club’ in R. Gilchrist, T. Jeffs, J. Spence and J. Walker (eds.) Essays in the History of Youth and Community Work, Lyme Regis: Russell House.

For an Article:

Pitts, J. (2007) ‘Who Cares What Works?’ Youth and Policy, No.95, pp.5-24.

For a Report:

HMSO (1982) ‘Experience and Participation’ (The Thompson Report), CMND 8686, London.

For a Web Page, please follow the examples above as far as possible, and add at the end the web address plus date accessed.

In multi-authored citations, the names of all authors should be given in the reference list but in the body of the article use the first author’s surname followed by et. al..

Abbreviations

Abbreviations that have attained common usage can be used, e.g. USA.

Those which are specialist or generally less well known should be spelled out in the first instance with the abbreviated form appearing in parentheses, e.g. British Youth Council (BYC). The abbreviated form can be used thereafter.

Tables, Graphs and Diagrams

These should be set out clearly, numbered where relevant and included in the appropriate position in the text.

Endnotes

Please limit the use of supplementary notes as far as possible. When these are necessary, use endnotes and not footnotes. Use the simple number format (1, 2, 3) in parentheses in the appropriate position in the text to refer to an Endnote. List corresponding notes at the end of the article under the subheading, Notes.

General

Please refer to previous issues of the journal if you are unsure about any aspect of presentation.

Thinking Space

Thinking Space is a new section encouraging a wide range of authors to submit articles to the journal. Articles submitted for the ‘Thinking Space’ should be original opinion pieces that lead to suggestions for further analysis, and/or research.

Youth and Policy’s editorial group encourage submission to this section by practitioners and new writers, as well as by more established authors.

 Submission and Editorial Decision:

Original and unsolicited articles submitted for this section that are appropriate to the journal and which are adequately presented will be reviewed by the editorial group will make the final decision.

Decisions will be within the following range:

  • To publish without modification;
  • To publish after minor amendments by the author;
  • To ask the author to undertake some rewriting and to resubmit for reconsideration;
  • Not to publish.

The editorial group reserve the right to make minor modifications to manuscripts before they go to press, with reference to house style, legibility and grammatical conventions. However, any in-depth editing will be discussed with the author(s) prior to publication.

Manuscripts should be submitted as an email attachment written in the email subject ‘Thinking Space’. They should be sent in the first instance to articles@youthandpolicy.org.

Length and Content:

Articles should be short and concise with no more than 2000 words in length, and with minimal references.

The discussions in the article should not necessarily be based on research but instead be a critical reflection on subjects, issues, and experiences relating to youth and community work and related professions.

Presentation and style:

All articles should be typed with double spacing, preferably using Arial, minimum font size 12.

All articles should be written in English. The language should be accessible, free from jargon and sensitive to the issue of equality and difference.

Use English spelling conventions (eg programme, organise, neighbourhood).

Other appropriate artistic approach to writing (eg poetry, letter) could be explored. However, this will be subject to the editorial group approval.

Please refer to the Youth and Policy Style Sheet for instructions for cover sheet, quotations, abbreviations, tables, graphs and diagrams.

Abstract and keywords, headings and subheadings, and endnotes are not necessary.

Abstract and keywords, headings and subheadings, and endnotes are not necessary.

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